Article

Reading Education

G. Reid Lyon and Timothy Odegard

in Education

ISBN: 9780199756810
Published online December 2011 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199756810-0030
Reading Education

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  • Education
  • Organization and Management of Education
  • Philosophy and Theory of Education
  • Schools Studies
  • Teaching Skills and Techniques

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Reading is defined by a range of different theoretical fields, including education, linguistics, psychology, and cognitive science. In general, there is agreement across definitions that learning to read is a lengthy and complex developmental cognitive process where the act of reading words accurately and fluently leads to an understanding of a written linguistic message. The term literacy typically conveys a broader meaning. For example, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) defines literacy as the “ability to identify, understand, interpret, create, communicate, compute and use printed and written materials associated with varying contexts. . . .” From a scientific perspective, it is clear that reading skills required for comprehension develop in parallel with oral language. However, in contrast to listening and speaking abilities, which develop naturally, reading skills are acquired and must be taught. There is widespread agreement that the ultimate goals of reading are to comprehend information presented in print for the purposes of lifelong learning, to communicate thoughts and ideas with others, and to gain opportunities for educational, occupational, and economic success. The citations included in this entry lead a user to works that provide a comprehensive examination of theoretical, conceptual, and scientific, cultural, and ideological perspectives relevant to fields of reading in general and that inform teacher preparation, instructional practices, and education policy in particular. The references have been selected on the basis of their impact on reading education practices and education policy, their clarity, and their usefulness in representing multiple perspectives.

Article.  6612 words. 

Subjects: Education ; Organization and Management of Education ; Philosophy and Theory of Education ; Schools Studies ; Teaching Skills and Techniques

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