Article

Single-Salary Schedule

Peter Witham

in Education

ISBN: 9780199756810
Published online December 2011 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199756810-0032
Single-Salary Schedule

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The single-salary schedule has become a nearly universal feature of public school teachers. In a single-salary schedule, often referred to as a step-and-lane schedule, rows indicate a teacher’s experience and the columns indicate the levels of graduate coursework completed or degrees obtained. Within a single-salary schedule, as teachers gain years of experience, they advance down the rows of the schedule, receiving pay increases at each “step”; as they gain education, they advance across the schedule’s columns, shifting pay upward to reward attainment of a master’s degree or some other accumulation of credit. The single-salary schedule has received a great deal of criticism in the past two decades due to the lack of sensitivity to measures of teacher effectiveness and teaching in the highest-need schools and subject areas. Recent advancements in measuring teacher effectiveness have led to increased interest in alternatives to the single-salary schedule. The most popular alternative has been supplementing or replacing the single-salary schedule with performance incentives. The relatively small number of State Education Agencies (SEAs) and Local Education Agencies (LEAs) experimenting with Performance-Based Compensation systems are utilizing additional measures of teacher effectiveness to pay teachers. These new approaches to paying teachers are often met with resistance, as there is lack of uniform agreement on the validity and reliability of the instruments used to measure teacher effectiveness. It is certain that there will continue to be a great deal of debate about the best alternative to the single-salary schedule. One thing that academics, policymakers, and educational stakeholders agree on is that there is a need for more rigorous research on the impact of the single-salary schedule relative to alternatives such as performance incentives based on multiple measures of teacher performance.

Article.  4376 words. 

Subjects: Education ; Organization and Management of Education ; Philosophy and Theory of Education ; Schools Studies ; Teaching Skills and Techniques

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