Article

Education For Children with Autism

Kathleen M. McCoy and Ann Bormett

in Education

ISBN: 9780199756810
Published online April 2013 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199756810-0082
Education For Children with Autism

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Education for children and youth with autism, a disorder affecting the neurological system resulting in atypical development, addresses three basic areas: social skills, language, and stereotypic or repetitive behaviors. Proficiency levels with these behaviors are highly diverse, but general consensus holds that the earlier in the child’s life these needs are addressed the more likely more typical behavior will develop. In addition, research has indicated that many children with autism learn skills more easily and quickly when provided with visual supports. Although many children with autism are educated in the general education classroom, almost as many are educated in special programs or clinical settings. The more severe the atypical behavior, the more likely the learner will be in a special setting. Interventions for children with autism must take into account any comorbid conditions, such as learning disabilities or intellectual disability. Medical issues are also common in children with more severe involvement with autism and must be taken into account when developing interventions. Although specialized programs have been designed for this population, instructional approaches must be adapted to align with the needs of the individual learner. National trends, such as differentiation of instruction and instructional practices focusing on data-based decision making, hold promise for the education of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Public awareness has been raised owing to the rapidly growing numbers of children in this population, resulting in more educational services for children, research opportunities, and teacher training programs.

Article.  7365 words. 

Subjects: Education ; Organization and Management of Education ; Philosophy and Theory of Education ; Schools Studies ; Teaching Skills and Techniques

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