Article

Early Modern British Metrical Psalmody (1535-1700)

Timothy Duguid

in Music

ISBN: 9780199757824
Published online March 2013 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199757824-0103
Early Modern British Metrical Psalmody (1535-1700)

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Music
  • Applied Music
  • Ethnomusicology
  • Music Theory and Analysis
  • Musicology and Music History
  • Music Education and Pedagogy

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

The Book of Psalms has always played an important role in Christian belief and worship practice, but the 16th century saw a renewed emphasis on this book of the Bible. In Britain, the practice of singing poetic settings of the psalms has been traditionally connected with Presbyterian or Calvinistic worship practice, but British metrical psalmody was actually rooted in Lutheran devotional practice. The earliest editions of metrical psalms printed and circulated in both England and Scotland appeared in the 1530s and 1540s, and they were based on Lutheran texts. Within this context, Thomas Sternhold would begin to write versifications of the psalms. He printed a selection of these psalms in 1547, dedicating them to his employer, Edward VI. Although it contained only thirty-six psalms, this volume would have a dramatic impact on the future of British psalmody and, more broadly, English-language liturgical music. Modified versions of his psalms would continue to appear in print in England until 1828, and his texts popularized Common Metre (8.6.8.6)—a verse that continues to dominate English-language liturgical music today. After Sternhold died, his printer enlisted the help of John Hopkins to add to Sternhold’s psalms, and the resulting collection would become the most printed edition during Edward’s reign.

Article.  7488 words. 

Subjects: Music ; Applied Music ; Ethnomusicology ; Music Theory and Analysis ; Musicology and Music History ; Music Education and Pedagogy

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.