Article

Indian Army in World War I

Kaushik Roy

in Military History

ISBN: 9780199791279
Published online February 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199791279-0039
Indian Army in World War I

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The Army of India (or Army in India) included the Indian Army, Imperial Service Troops (henceforth IST), and the units of the British Army stationed in India. The latter were paid by the government of India and in the subcontinent came under the operational control of the Commander-in-Chief India. The IST comprised selected units of the princely armies, which were commanded by British officers and included in the table of organization for deployment inside and outside India along with the British units and the Indian Army. The Indian Army was composed of Indians as rank and file but was officered by the British. Until 1914, the army was used for internal security, guarding the borders of the Raj against the Pathan tribes, and also against a probable Afghan invasion sponsored by Russia. Occasionally, the army was also used for guarding the extra-Indian imperial outposts of Britain. During World War I, the Army in India was used against the Central Powers. The Indian Army became the largest volunteer army in the world, a feat that would be repeated during World War II. In 1914 the Army in India comprised 76,214 British and 154,437 Indians. In 1918 the number of combatant Indian soldiers rose to 573,000. The mobilization of massive amounts of military manpower between 1914 and 1918 had long-term consequences both for the colonizers and the colonized.

Article.  9534 words. 

Subjects: Military History ; Pre-20th Century Warfare ; First World War ; Second World War ; Post-WW2 Military History

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