Article

Intervention

Nicholas Tsagourias

in International Law

ISBN: 9780199796953
Published online March 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199796953-0016
Intervention

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  • International Law
  • International Courts and Tribunals
  • Private International Law and Conflict of Laws
  • Public International Law

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Intervention refers to interference in the affairs of a state. Such interference can take many different forms: political or military, direct or indirect. International law is mainly concerned with dictatorial or coercive interference in a state’s affairs, which is in principle prohibited. The scope of the prohibition is, however, affected by the political, legal, or normative changes taking place in the international society at different stages of its development. For this reason, the legality of certain interventions (such as interventions for the protection of human rights, democracy, or self-determination) has given rise to interesting debates. The legal literature on intervention reflects these developments, but it should be noted that intervention is not exclusively a legal concept. Intervention is also a political concept, and international relations scholarship has a long history of dealing with this phenomenon. This article focuses on military intervention only and approaches it in general, as well as in specific, terms. After a general overview, textbooks as well as the sources of law relating to intervention will be presented. Because intervention can take place in a number of different forms, they are covered as follows: By the United Nations in the Domestic Jurisdiction of States, By Invitation, In Civil Wars, Humanitarian Intervention, Pro-Democratic Intervention, and Self-Determination. Because intervention is a multifaceted concept, the resources included here approach the topic from a broad spectrum base, recognizing the various influences involved in the decision on whether to intervene.

Article.  10389 words. 

Subjects: International Law ; International Courts and Tribunals ; Private International Law and Conflict of Laws ; Public International Law

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