Article

The Law of Treaties

Antonio Remiro Brotons

in International Law

ISBN: 9780199796953
Published online March 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199796953-0034
The Law of Treaties

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  • International Law
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  • Private International Law and Conflict of Laws
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The Law of Treaties is a set of international and national rules that governs the life of treaties from their formation to termination, passing through all their effects and disturbances. The majority of international rules have been codified by conventions of universal vocation, the most important of which is the Convention on the Law of Treaties concluded between states (Vienna, 23 May 1969). The content of the convention is comprehensive but not exhaustive. It covers only interstate relations and excludes issues such as the international responsibility for noncompliance, the effects of the outbreak of hostilities, and state succession in respect of treaties. The conventional relations between states and international organizations and between different international organizations are regulated by the convention of 21 March 1986, which conforms to the 1969 convention. Besides, the succession of states in respect of treaties is the subject of the convention of 23 August 1978. Customary rules are applicable to all issues that fall outside the scope of application of these conventions. The dispositive character of a number of international norms and their references to domestic law explain the existence of numerous national provisions applicable to treaties. Treaties have existed since political communities have been willing to interact peacefully and are the best sources of rights and obligations. The coexistence and cooperation among international subjects rests substantially upon them. The progressive expansion of their material objects has been accompanied by a growing technical complexity.

Article.  19082 words. 

Subjects: International Law ; International Courts and Tribunals ; Private International Law and Conflict of Laws ; Public International Law

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