Article

Implicit Association Test (IAT)

Steven Lehr and Mahzarin Banaji

in Psychology

ISBN: 9780199828340
Published online November 2011 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199828340-0033
Implicit Association Test (IAT)

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Starting in the 1970s, as microcomputers made possible the measurement of mental computations in milliseconds, psychologists began to develop computer-based measures of unconscious cognition. The Implicit Association Test (IAT) is one such measure that has been used primarily to understand social cognition. The IAT was initially used to measure implicit intergroup attitudes, was quickly adapted to measure implicit stereotypes and self-concept, and has subsequently been used in hundreds of studies of psychological processes, from person perception and intergroup cognition to psychopathology and legal decisions. Indeed, since its introduction in 1998, the IAT has emerged as a dominant measure of implicit cognition, appearing in more than 2,000 published articles. This article briefly reviews the origins, validity, and interpretation of the IAT, the scientific knowledge gained from it and the guidelines for its use in research.

Article.  10335 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Cognitive Psychology ; Developmental Psychology ; Health Psychology ; History and Systems in Psychology ; Educational Psychology ; Social Psychology

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