Article

Organizational Justice

Deborah Rupp and Meghan Thornton

in Psychology

ISBN: 9780199828340
Published online November 2011 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199828340-0044
Organizational Justice

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  • Psychology
  • Cognitive Psychology
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  • Educational Psychology
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Organizational justice refers to employee perceptions of fairness in the workplace. These perceptions can be classified into four categories: distributive, procedural, informational, and interactional. Distributive justice reflects perceptions regarding fairness of outcomes, while procedural justice reflects perceptions of processes that lead to these outcomes. A third type of justice, informational justice, relates to the accounts provided for justice-related events. Finally, interpersonal justice reflects perceptions of interpersonal interactions and treatment. Research demonstrates that, although correlated, these specific justice judgments are each predictive of work- and worker-related outcomes. Whereas this classic taxonomy reflects historically relevant theories that sought to identify criteria or decision rules used to determine the fairness of outcomes, procedures, and interpersonal treatment, more contemporary perspectives have cast a broader net. Contemporary justice research examines the reasons employees care about justice (content theories) and the processes that lead to both the formation of fairness perceptions, as well as individuals reactions to perceived injustice (process theories). While the lion’s share of the justice literature to date has focused on the degree to which employees view themselves as fairly treated, more recent theories consider employees’ reactions to the treatment of others. This has also led researchers to consider employees’ reactions to corporate social responsibility (considered a special case of third-party justice perceptions). Finally, justice research has become increasingly multilevel, as research has begun to explore how shared perceptions of justice form within work groups and organizations (justice climate), and has considered how justice perceptions and reactions vary across cultural groups (e.g., organizational and national cultures).

Article.  7139 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Cognitive Psychology ; Developmental Psychology ; Health Psychology ; History and Systems in Psychology ; Educational Psychology ; Social Psychology

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