Article

Rehabilitation Psychology

Dana S. Dunn

in Psychology

ISBN: 9780199828340
Published online November 2011 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199828340-0048
Rehabilitation Psychology

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  • Psychology
  • Cognitive Psychology
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Rehabilitation psychology is a subfield of psychology dedicated to developing therapeutic interventions aimed at promoting the health and well-being of people with disabilities and chronic health conditions or diseases. Rehabilitation psychologists apply and extend psychological knowledge toward ameliorating psychological, social, mental, psychiatric, environmental, and other challenges that prevent people with disabilities from leading meaningful, independent, and productive lives. Rehabilitation psychologists are therapists, educators, counselors, administrators, consultants, advocates, and researchers who possess a wide variety of training and skills, including knowledge of neuropsychology, that qualify them to work constructively with clients with disabilities or other chronic health conditions, their caregivers, and their families. This article opens with overviews of rehabilitation psychology and representative professional journals and websites. Subsequent sections provide sample references for research methodology and theory development, rehabilitation assessment, neuropsychology, and practice issues in rehabilitation. A section on selected chronic conditions reviews resources concerning brain injury, strokes, spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis, limb amputations, and depression and its links to disability. A separate section considers issues connected with the treatment of children with disabilities. One of the largest areas of the rehabilitation literature concerns psychosocial issues. The references in this section examine the social psychology of disability, attitudes toward people with disabilities, attributions and adaptation issues, insider and outsider perspectives, social interactions between people with and without disabilities, value changes and the acceptance of disability, and positive psychology and its connections to and implications for rehabilitation psychology. Narratives on disability provide phenomenological accounts of what the experience of disability is actually like (as opposed to what it is presumed to be). The last section of this bibliography offers references on disabilities studies, an interdisciplinary area of inquiry with some promising connections to rehabilitation psychology.

Article.  12556 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Cognitive Psychology ; Developmental Psychology ; Health Psychology ; History and Systems in Psychology ; Educational Psychology ; Social Psychology

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