Article

Language

Cindy K. Chung and James Pennebaker

in Psychology

ISBN: 9780199828340
Published online November 2011 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199828340-0078
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  • Psychology
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Although language is the primary medium by which we communicate with others and reveal our thoughts and feelings, remarkably few psychologists have studied the psychology of language. Until recently, the complexity of language was simply too overwhelming to tackle. Since the advent of computer-based technologies, however, an increasing number of researchers have begun exploring the links between natural language use and real-world behaviors. The psychological study of language has roots in philosophy, with considerable influence and overlap with the fields of anthropology, sociology, linguistics, and communications. Since the 1990s, work in language psychology has been associated with a host of newer disciplines involving natural language processing, such as cognitive science, artificial intelligence, computational linguistics, and even subfields of engineering. The different approaches to the study of language adopted by these various fields are often complementary, with each approach informing the others. Oftentimes, language scholars from different disciplines fail to appreciate each other’s perspectives. Linguists, for example, are primarily interested in the structure and function of language. Computational linguists are usually interested in developing models to best classify two or more groups of language processes. Psychologists who study language are actually interested in the psychological states of the people who are generating the language samples. Accordingly, the readings in this bibliography come from a wide variety of fields but with an emphasis on what might be useful to psychologists in their research on language.

Article.  10161 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Cognitive Psychology ; Developmental Psychology ; Health Psychology ; History and Systems in Psychology ; Educational Psychology ; Social Psychology

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