Article

Social Class and Social Status

Carmi Schooler

in Psychology

ISBN: 9780199828340
Published online February 2013 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199828340-0085
Social Class and Social Status

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This article provides a selection of articles and books that deal with social class or social status from perspectives that are directly germane to empirically oriented psychology and sociological social psychology. “Social class” and “social status” are terms that appear in a range of theoretical and empirical research literatures that are too broad to encompass in one article. Consequently, although a certain number of particularly relevant books and articles from other fields are referenced, the central focus of this review will be on papers appearing in the psychology literature, including sociological social psychology. In addition, the concentration will be more on articles than on books. It will also be more on works and reviews that relate empirical findings to theories than on those primarily presenting, on the one hand, theoretical formulations or, on the other, “raw” empirical findings. To clarify what is being covered this article begins with a set of definitions of systematically interrelated terms directly developed from the writing and class lectures of the noted sociologist Robert Merton (Schooler 1994, cited under Definitions). A major advantage of this set of definitions is that it is theoretically and substantively neutral. Consequently, the definitions impose little constraint on the types of “causal” interrelationships among variables that can be described and tested.

Article.  5875 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Cognitive Psychology ; Developmental Psychology ; Health Psychology ; History and Systems in Psychology ; Educational Psychology ; Social Psychology

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