Article

Metacognition

Lisa K. Son

in Psychology

ISBN: 9780199828340
Published online February 2013 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199828340-0102
Metacognition

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  • Psychology
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Metacognition, generally defined as cognition about one’s cognition, has been linked and compared in the past with a variety of terms: consciousness, self-reflection, self-awareness, language, frontal lobe function, agency, and theory of mind. Over the past half-decade, its definition has been continuously refined and formalized, paralleling a growing number of experimental paradigms, results, and applications. While undeniably related to memory, metacognition entails higher-order thinking, a kind of thinking that focuses on the role of the active learner. The process of metacognition is thought to develop gradually in young children, and, although with controversy, is often touted as the ability that sets human animals apart from nonhuman animals.

Article.  11176 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Cognitive Psychology ; Developmental Psychology ; Health Psychology ; History and Systems in Psychology ; Educational Psychology ; Social Psychology

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