Article

Succession

David J. Gibson

in Ecology

ISBN: 9780199830060
Published online May 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199830060-0001
Succession

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  • Applied Ecology (Environmental Science)
  • Ecology and Conservation
  • Plant Ecology
  • Zoology and Animal Sciences

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In the field of ecology, the study of succession enjoys a fairly long history, certainly as long as ecology has been recognized as a discipline. Succession was discussed unofficially as early as the nineteenth century, but the term as we understand it today did not appear until the turn of the twentieth century (see History). Succession remains a core tenet within ecology, although it is sometimes subsumed with the broader discussion of vegetation dynamics. The early view that succession is a deterministic, predictable process has changed as ecologists now better appreciate the hierarchical, nonequilibrial nature of communities and ecosystems. Primary research has moved on from simply describing the patterns of primary and secondary successional change. Today’s debates are dominated by the search for a mechanistic understanding and the application of successional theory for ecosystem management, rehabilitation, and restoration. The readings included in this bibliography on issues related to succession include the history of successional studies, primary and secondary succession, successional theory, and applications.

Article.  8757 words. 

Subjects: Applied Ecology (Environmental Science) ; Ecology and Conservation ; Plant Ecology ; Zoology and Animal Sciences

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