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adhesion


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n.1. the union of two normally separate surfaces, such as the moving surfaces of joints, by fibrous connective tissue developing in an inflamed or damaged region. (The fibrous tissue itself is also called an adhesion.) Adhesions between loops of intestine often occur following abdominal surgery but only rarely cause symptoms, such as intestinal obstruction. If the pericardial sac is affected by adhesion, the movements of the heart may be restricted. 2. a healing process in which the edges of a wound fit together. In primary adhesion there is very little granulation tissue; in secondary adhesion the two edges are joined together by granulation tissue.

1. the union of two normally separate surfaces, such as the moving surfaces of joints, by fibrous connective tissue developing in an inflamed or damaged region. (The fibrous tissue itself is also called an adhesion.) Adhesions between loops of intestine often occur following abdominal surgery but only rarely cause symptoms, such as intestinal obstruction. If the pericardial sac is affected by adhesion, the movements of the heart may be restricted. 2. a healing process in which the edges of a wound fit together. In primary adhesion there is very little granulation tissue; in secondary adhesion the two edges are joined together by granulation tissue.

Subjects: Medicine and Health.


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