Overview

After the Race


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James Joyce (1882—1941) writer

Dubliners

 

'After the Race' can also refer to...

‘After the Race’

After Slavery: Race, Labor, and Citizenship in the Reconstruction South

Slavery, Race, and Political Ideology in the White Christian South Before and After the Civil War

Beyond Redemption: Race, Violence, and the American South after the Civil War

The Propaganda War in the Rhineland: Weimar Germany, Race and Occupation after World War I

Christians and the Color Line: Race and Religion after Divided by Faith

Race, Place, and Nostalgia after the Counterculture: Keith Jarrett and Pat Metheny on ECM

New Orleans after the Civil War: Race, Politics, and a New Birth of Freedom

Obesity and Mortality After Breast Cancer by Race/Ethnicity: The California Breast Cancer Survivorship Consortium

Matthew Jones. After Hiroshima: The United States, Race and Nuclear Weapons in Asia, 1945–1965.

The Association of Race, Gender, and Comorbidity With Mortality and Function After Hip Fracture

Sheldon Rubenfeld (ed.), Medicine after the Holocaust; From the Master Race to the Human Genome and Beyond

Stephen V. Ash. A Massacre in Memphis: The Race Riot That Shook the Nation One Year after the Civil War.

Black Yanks in the Pacific: Race in the Making of American Military Empire after World War II

Steve Estes. Charleston in Black and White: Race and Power in the South after the Civil Rights Movement.

Changes in Women's Use of Hormones After the Women's Health Initiative Estrogen and Progestin Trial by Race, Education, and Income

Bruce E. Baker and Brian Kelly, editors. After Slavery: Race, Labor, and Citizenship in the Reconstruction South.

J. Russell Hawkins and Phillip Luke Sinitiere, editors. Christians and the Color Line: Race and Religion after Divided by Faith

Re-Membering Blackness After Reconstruction: Race, Rape, and Political Desire in the Work of Thomas Dixon, Jr.

 

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Quick Reference

(1904), a story in James Joyce's Dubliners (1914). Jimmy Doyle, a butcher's son, attends a motor-race with other young men more cosmopolitan than he, and struggles to keep up with them in hilarity and recklessness.

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Subjects: Literature.


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