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agricultural protection


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'agricultural protection' can also refer to...

agricultural protection

agricultural protection

Agriculture and Consumer Protection Act (1973)

Agriculture and Consumer Protection Act (1973)

Protection, Subsidies, and Agricultural Trade

Agriculture and Consumer Protection Act (1973)

Food Security and Agricultural Protection in South Korea

From Prices to Incomes: Agricultural Subsidization without Protection?

Economic Risk and Water Quality Protection in Agriculture

The political economy of agricultural protection: Sweden 1887

GI protection in China: new measures for administration of geographical indications of agricultural products

Political economy determinants of agricultural protection levels in EU member states: An empirical investigation

Farmland Protection and Agricultural Land Values at the Urban-Rural Fringe: British Columbia’s Agricultural Land Reserve

EDWARDS, Robert (born 1957), PhD; FRSC, Professor of Crop Protection and Head, School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, since 2014

Agricultural protection and support in the European Economic Community, 1962–92: rent-seeking or welfare policy?

Declaration between Austria-Hungary and Italy for the Protection of Birds useful to Agriculture, signed at Budapest/Rome, 5/29 November 1875

Convention for the Protection of Agriculture between the Argentine Republic, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay, signed at Montevideo, 10 May 1913

Convention between Austria-Hungary, Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Liechtenstein, Luxemburg, Monaco, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland for the Protection of Birds useful to Agriculture, signed at Paris, 19 March 1902

 

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The use of tariffs and trade controls on agricultural products to raise their prices in a country and thus to increase its farmers' incomes. This may be desired to slow down the tendency for the share of agriculture in total income and employment to decrease. It may also aim at increasing self-sufficiency in foodstuffs and agricultural raw materials in the interests of national security. Agriculture is protected in most industrial countries, particularly those of the European Union and Japan. Agricultural protection in advanced countries hinders economic growth in less developed countries, most of which are net exporters of agricultural products.

Subjects: Economics.


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