Overview

Allied Powers


'Allied Powers' can also refer to...

Allied powers

Allied Powers

Allied Powers

Allied Powers

Allied and Associated Powers

Allied and Associated Powers

LAITY, Mark Franklyn (born 1955), Chief Strategic Communications, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe, since 2007

Armistice Convention between the Allied Powers and Bulgaria, signed at Prilep, 29 September 1918

Conditions of an Armistice between Germany and the Allied Powers, signed at Compiègne, 11 November 1918

Military Convention between the Allied Powers and Hungary, signed at Belgrade, 13 November 1918

SHOOSMITH, Stephen Newton (1900 - 1956), Principal Staff Officer to Deputy Supreme Allied Commander, Allied Powers, Europe, 1954–56

SALMON, Andrew (born 1959), Deputy Chief of Staff Force Readiness, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe, 2010–13

GRIBBON, Nigel St George (1917 - 2009), Assistant Chief of Staff, (Intelligence), Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe, 1970–72

Convention between the Allied Powers and Germany for the Prolongation of the Armistice of 11 November 1918, signed at Trèves, 16 February 1919

Armistice Convention between Great Britain and the Allied Powers, and Turkey, signed at Mudros, 30 October 1918

Protocol of the Armistice between Austria-Hungary and the Allied Powers, signed at Padua, 3 November 1918

Convention between the Allied Powers and Germany for the Prolongation of the Armistice Convention of 11 November 1918, signed at Trèves, 13 December 1918

Convention between the Allied Powers and Germany prolonging the Armistice of 11 November 1918, signed at Trèves, 16 January 1919

Contemporaries' opinions of the Allied and Central Powers' performance during the First World War: measuring turning points in perception with sovereign debt prices

 

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A term for the co-belligerents who fought against the Central and Axis Powers in World War I and World War II respectively. Strictly speaking, in World War I the Allies comprised those countries who had created a formal alliance of cooperation, principally the British Empire and France. The USA and other countries (Brazil, Bolivia, China, Tibet, etc.) entered the war without entering any official pact, and were thus officially known as Associate Powers of the Allies. In World War II, around 50 countries entered the war on the side of the Allies, though some (e.g. in Latin America) never sent any troops into battle. During the war itself, Britain, the USA, and the USSR were the dominant Allies (‘the Big Three’), and coordinated the progress of the war and its aftermath at meetings in Tehran, Yalta, and Potsdam. After the war, France was accepted as a fourth main ally. The term ‘the Allies’ has been applied to military coalitions led by the US since, notably in the Gulf War and the war against the Taliban in Afghanistan of 2001–2.

Subjects: Warfare and Defence.


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