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Anatomy of Melancholy


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'Anatomy of Melancholy' can also refer to...

The Anatomy of Melancholy

Anatomy of Melancholy, The

Anatomy of Melancholy, The

Anatomy of Melancholy

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The Anatomy of Melancholy, Vol. 3: Text Text

The Anatomy of Melancholy, Vol. 1: Text Text

Beyond Ophelia: The Anatomy of Female Melancholy

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Burton's ‘Turning Picture’: Argument and Anxiety in The Anatomy of Melancholy

Mad world: Robert Burton’s The Anatomy of Melancholy

“Idleness is an appendix to nobility”: The Preface to Robert Burton's ‘The Anatomy of Melancholy’

Robert Burton the Spiritual Physician: Religion and Medicine in The Anatomy of Melancholy

Melancholy, Medicine and Religion in Early Modern England: Reading The Anatomy of Melancholy, by Mary Ann Lund

The Anatomy of Melancholy, Vol. 5: Commentary from Part. 1, Sect. 2, Memb. 4, Subs. 1 to The End of the Second Partition Commentary from Part. 1, Sect. 2, Memb. 4, Subs. 1 to The End of the Second Partition

The Anatomy of Melancholy, Vol. 4: Commentary up to Part. 1, Sect. 2, Memb. 3, Subs. 15, ‘Misery of Schollers’ Commentary up to Part. 1, Sect. 2, Memb. 3, Subs. 15, ‘Misery of Schollers’

The Anatomy of Melancholy, Vol. 6: Commentary on the Third Partition, together with Biobibliographical and Topical Indexes Commentary on the Third Partition, together with Biobibliographical and Topical Indexes

Review: The Anatomy of Melancholy, vol. VI, Commentary on the Third Partition, together with Biobibliographical and Topical Indexes

 

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By Robert Burton (1621; enlarged 1621–51). In appearance the Anatomy is a medical work, in effect an affectionate satire on the inefficacy of human learning and endeavour. Burton finds melancholy to be universally present in mankind, ‘an inbred malady in every one of us’. The book is made up of a lengthy introduction and three ‘partitions’. Burton quotes and paraphrases an extraordinary range of authors, making his book a storehouse of anecdote and maxim. Its tone suits Burton's choice of pseudonym, ‘Democritus Junior’: Democritus was ‘the laughing philosopher’. The Anatomy gave Keats the story for ‘Lamia’.

Subjects: Literature.


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Robert Burton (1577—1640) writer


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