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arcade


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1 Series of arches on the same plane, supported by colonnettes, columns, piers, or pilasters. Varieties of arcade include:alternating:with arches springing from the ends of two-column colonnades, resembling a series of overlapping serlianas;blind:arcade engaged with or attached to a wall, also called surface-or wall-arcade;coupled:carried on coupled columns;interlacing or intersecting:overlapping arcades, e.g. Romanesque overlapping arcades, producing a series of pointed arches, as in Southwell Minster, Notts. (C12);nave:series of arches on piers separating the nave from the aisle and supporting the clerestorey in a church;regular:any series of repetitive arches, also called a simple arcade;screen:arcade standing on its own as a feature, or used as a screen;simple:see regular above;surface:see blind above;syncopated:two rows of arcade, one in front of the other, with the colonnette shafts of one set in front of the centres of the arches behind, as in Lincoln Cathedral;wall:see blind above.

alternating:with arches springing from the ends of two-column colonnades, resembling a series of overlapping serlianas;

blind:arcade engaged with or attached to a wall, also called surface-or wall-arcade;

coupled:carried on coupled columns;

interlacing or intersecting:overlapping arcades, e.g. Romanesque overlapping arcades, producing a series of pointed arches, as in Southwell Minster, Notts. (C12);

nave:series of arches on piers separating the nave from the aisle and supporting the clerestorey in a church;

regular:any series of repetitive arches, also called a simple arcade;

screen:arcade standing on its own as a feature, or used as a screen;

simple:see regular above;

surface:see blind above;

syncopated:two rows of arcade, one in front of the other, with the colonnette shafts of one set in front of the centres of the arches behind, as in Lincoln Cathedral;

wall:see blind above.

2 Row of vertical arcade-posts carrying the arcade-plate, and set between the nave or central area and aisles of a timber-framed aisled building.

3 Top-lit roofed passage with shops on either side, known as a shopping-arcade, equivalent to the galerie, galleria, or passage on the Continent.

4 Avenue arched over with trees and shrubs.

4 Avenue arched over with trees and shrubs.

Alcock, Barley, Dixon, & Meeson (1996);Geist (1983);MacKeith (1986)

arcade. (a) Simple regular Romanesque blind arcade with scallop-capitals and corbel-table (Church of St Peter, Northampton, c.1150). (b) Romanesque blind interlacing arcade: the intersecting semicircular arches produce pointed arches (Christ Church, Oxford, c.1180). (c) Simple or regular Classical arcade on piers. (d ) Classical arcade on coupled columns. (e) Simple or regular Classical arcade on columns. (f) Alternating Classical arcade consisting of arches carried onentablatures supported on columns, so is a mixture of colonnade and arcade. It resembles a series of overlapping Serlianas. (g) Syncopated First Pointed arcading, (south choiraisle, Lincoln Cathedral, c.1200).

Subjects: Architecture.


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