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aria


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(It.).

Air. From the time of A. Scarlatti in the 18th cent. onwards this has had the definite implication of a more or less lengthy and well‐developed solo vocal piece in ABA form normally called a da capo aria. The singer was expected to add ornaments in the repeated A section. The 19th‐cent. operatic aria became more elaborate and complex. Arias used to be rather minutely classified as (a)aria cantabile, slow and smooth; (b)aria di portamento, in long notes and dignified, to be sung in legato style; (c)aria di mezzo carattere, more passionate and with often elaborate orch. acc.; (d)aria parlante, declamatory; (e)aria di bravura (or d'agilità, or d'abilità), requiring great v.‐control; (f)aria all'unisono, with acc. in unison or octaves with the vocal part; (g)aria d'imitazione, imitative of bird‐song, hunting hns., etc.; (h)aria concertata with elaborate acc.; and so on.

(a)aria cantabile, slow and smooth; (b)aria di portamento, in long notes and dignified, to be sung in legato style; (c)aria di mezzo carattere, more passionate and with often elaborate orch. acc.; (d)aria parlante, declamatory; (e)aria di bravura (or d'agilità, or d'abilità), requiring great v.‐control; (f)aria all'unisono, with acc. in unison or octaves with the vocal part; (g)aria d'imitazione, imitative of bird‐song, hunting hns., etc.; (h)aria concertata with elaborate acc.; and so on.

Subjects: Music.


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