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aspheric


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aspheric

Feedback effects of aspherical supernova explosions on galaxies

Autocollimating compensator for controlling aspheric optical surfaces

Observational characteristics and possible asphericity of overluminous Type Ia supernovae

SN 2007uy – metamorphosis of an aspheric Type Ib explosion

Milking the spherical cow – on aspherical dynamics in spherical coordinates

Effect of asphericity in caustic mass estimates of galaxy clusters

Application of regionalized multiplet stripping to retrieval of aspherical structure constraints

Surface loading of a viscoelastic planet—III. Aspherical models

Twisted Homology Cobordism Invariants of Knots in Aspherical Manifolds

Effects of asphericity and substructure on the determination of cluster mass with weak gravitational lensing

Nebular emission-line profiles of Type Ib/c supernovae – probing the ejecta asphericity

Scaling for the intensity of radiation in spherical and aspherical planetary nebulae

Mode-sum to ray-sum transformation in a spherical and an aspherical earth

Finiteness of simple homotopy types up to s-cobordism of aspherical 4-manifolds

Multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of SN 2009ip: direct evidence for aspherical circumstellar material

Optical studies of SN 2009jf: a Type Ib supernova with an extremely slow decline and aspherical signature

Centroid moment tensor inversion of low-frequency seismic spectra using Green's functions for aspherical earth models

γ-rays from binary system with energetic pulsar and Be star with aspherical wind: PSR B1259−63/SS2883

 

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Describing a surface of a lens or mirror that has been given an optical figure which is not part of a sphere. The most common aspheric surface is the paraboloid, widely used for telescope mirrors. Another common aspheric surface is that used for the corrector plates of Schmidt–Cassegrain telescopes. In objective lenses most surfaces are spheroidal, one surface being aspheric to correct for aberrations.

Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics.


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