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astaxanthin


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astaxanthin

astaxanthin

astaxanthin

Metabolic engineering of the astaxanthin-biosynthetic pathway of Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous

Gastric inflammatory markers and interleukins in patients with functional dyspepsia treated with astaxanthin

Efficient screening for astaxanthin-overproducing mutants of the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous by flow cytometry

Decreased astaxanthin at high feeding rates in the calanoid copepod Acartia bifilosa

Stimulation of astaxanthin formation in the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous by the fungus Epicoccum nigrum

Inhibition of chemically-induced neoplastic transformation by a novel tetrasodium diphosphate astaxanthin derivative

Determination of Para Red, Sudan Dyes, Canthaxanthin, and Astaxanthin in Animal Feeds Using UPLC

Astaxanthin biosynthesis is enhanced by high carotenogenic gene expression and decrease of fatty acids and ergosterol in a Phaffia rhodozyma mutant strain

Sphingomonas astaxanthinifaciens sp. nov., a novel astaxanthin-producing bacterium of the family Sphingomonadaceae isolated from Misasa, Tottori, Japan

Astaxanthin formation in the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum expressing crtI, crtY, crtW and crtZ

Functional characterization of various algal carotenoid ketolases reveals that ketolating zeaxanthin efficiently is essential for high production of astaxanthin in transgenic Arabidopsis

Effect of astaxanthin produced by Phaffia rhodozyma on growth performance, meat quality, and fecal noxious gas emission in broilers

From genetic improvement to commercial-scale mass culture of a Chilean strain of the green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis with enhanced productivity of the red ketocarotenoid astaxanthin

 

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3,3′‐dihydroxy‐β,β‐carotene‐4,4′‐dione; a carotenoid pigment found mainly in animals (e.g. crustaceans, echinoderms) but also occurring in plants. It can occur free (as a red pigment), as an ester (e.g. the dipalmitate), or as a blue, brown, or green chromoprotein.

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Subjects: Chemistry — Medicine and Health.


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