Overview

backcountry


'backcountry' can also refer to...

backcountry

backcountry

backcountry

backcountry

backcountry recreation

backcountry recreation

backcountry recreation

Low Country/Backcountry: The Volatile Geopolitics of Revolutionary South Carolina November 1775–December 1775

Buying into a World of Goods: Early Consumers in Backcountry Virginia

Hope's Promise: Religion and Acculturation in the Southern Backcountry

The Unsettled Periphery: The Backcountry on the Eve of the American Revolution

“The Extention of His Majesties Dominions”: The Virginia Backcountry and the Reconfiguration of Imperial Frontiers

Buying into the World of Goods: Early Consumers in Backcountry Virginia. By Ann Smart Martin (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008. xiv plus 260 pp.)

Ed White. The Backcountry and the City: Colonization and Conflict in Early America. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 2005. Pp. xix, 236. $22.95

Johanna Miller Lewis. Artisans in the North Carolina Backcountry. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky 1995. Pp. xii, 200. $34.95

Artisans in the North Carolina Backcountry. By Johanna Miller Lewis. (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1995. xii, 200 pp. $34.95, ISBN 0-8131-1908-1.)

The Backcountry Towns of Colonial Virginia. By Christopher E. Hendricks. (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2006. xxii, 186 pp. $36.00, ISBN 1-57233-543-2.)

George Lloyd Johnson, Jr. The Frontier in the Colonial South: South Carolina Backcountry, 1736–1800. (Contributions in American History, number 175.) Westport, Conn.: Greenwood. 1997. Pp. xvi, 200. $57.95

S. SCOTT ROHRER. Hope's Promise: Religion and Acculturation in the Southern Backcountry. (Religion and American Culture.) Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press. 2005. Pp. xv, 266. $42.50

 

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A general term used in North America for all parts of wildlands in which there are no permanent, improved, or maintained access roads or working facilities (such as lumber mills, ski resorts, or settlements with permanent residents). Any current uses of the area only have primitive facilities, such as cabins, base camps, or undeveloped campgrounds.

Subjects: Environmental Science.


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