Overview

Michel Baius

(1513—1589)


Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

(1513–89),

Flemish theologian. Despite an earlier censure by the Sorbonne, he was one of the representatives of the University of Louvain at the Council of Trent. A papal bull of 1567 condemned various propositions from his writings without mentioning him by name. He made a formal recantation.

The main principles of ‘Baianism’ were: (1) that in the primitive state, innocence was not a supernatural gift of God to human beings but the necessary complement of human nature itself; (2) that original sin is not merely a privation of grace but habitual concupiscence, transmitted by heredity, and so even in unconscious children is a sin or moral evil of itself; and (3) that the sole work of redemption is to enable us to recover the gifts of original innocence and live moral lives; this end is achieved by the substitution of charity for concupiscence as the motive for each meritorious act. The grace conferred by redemption is thus not considered to be supernatural.

(1) that in the primitive state, innocence was not a supernatural gift of God to human beings but the necessary complement of human nature itself; (2) that original sin is not merely a privation of grace but habitual concupiscence, transmitted by heredity, and so even in unconscious children is a sin or moral evil of itself; and (3) that the sole work of redemption is to enable us to recover the gifts of original innocence and live moral lives; this end is achieved by the substitution of charity for concupiscence as the motive for each meritorious act. The grace conferred by redemption is thus not considered to be supernatural.

Subjects: Christianity.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.