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Order of the Bath


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Lord Orford Horace Walpole (1717—1797) author, politician, and patron of the arts

Lord Orford Robert Walpole (1676—1745) prime minister

knight

 

'Order of the Bath' can also refer to...

Bath, Order of the

Bath, Order of the

Bath, Order of the

Bath, Order of the

Bath, Order of the

Verses On The Revival Of The Order Of The Bath

BRADLEY, George Granville (1821 - 1903), Dean of the Order of the Bath

PEIRSE, Richard (Charles Fairfax) (1931 - 2014), Registrar and Secretary, Order of the Bath, 2002–06

MADDEN, Colin Duncan (1915 - 2000), Registrar and Secretary, Order of the Bath, 1979–85

BUTLER, Alfred Trego (1880 - 1946), Windsor Herald since 1931; late Genealogist Order of the Bath and (Hon.) of the Royal Victorian Order; Comdr of Order of St John of Jerusalem

MAYNE, Michael Clement Otway (1929 - 2006), Dean of Westminster, 1986–96, then Dean Emeritus; Dean of the Order of the Bath, 1986–96

HALL, John Robert (born 1949), Dean of Westminster, since 2006; Dean of the Order of the Bath, since 2006

FEILDING, Geoffrey Percy Thynne (1866 - 1932), Registrar and Secretary of the Order of the Bath since 1928

CROWLEY-MILLING, Denis (1919 - 1996), Registrar and Secretary, Order of the Bath, 1985–90 (Gentleman Usher of the Scarlet Rod, 1979–85)

HENDERSON, Iain Robert (born 1948), Registrar and Secretary, Order of the Bath, since 2006 (Gentleman Usher of the Scarlet Rod, 2002–06)

WOODCOCK, Thomas (born 1951), Garter Principal King of Arms, since 2010; Genealogist, Order of the Bath, since 2010

CARPENTER, Dr Edward Frederick (1910 - 1998), Dean of Westminster, 1974–85; Dean, Order of the Bath, 1974–85

GWYNN-JONES, Peter (Llewellyn) (1940 - 2010), Garter Principal King of Arms, 1995–2010; Genealogist, Order of the Bath, Order of St Michael and St George, and Order of St John, 1995–2010

MURRAY, (Charles) Wyndham (1844 - 1928), late Member of Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms; Gentleman Usher of the Scarlet Rod in the Order of the Bath, 1913–28

 

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Bathing as a symbol of purification was an element in the creation of spotless knights and the practice grew up of dubbing numbers of knights on grand occasions like coronations. By the time of Henry V they were known as knights of the Bath. In 1725 John Anstis, Garter King of Arms, suggested the ‘revival’ of the order. Walpole and George I agreed, partly to add lustre to the new regime, partly to fend off aspirants. The red ribbon became coveted. The Order was extended in 1815 and 1847.

Subjects: British History.


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