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biological stressor


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'biological stressor' can also refer to...

biological stressor

biological stressor

biological stressor

The biological response to stress and chronic pain

The Social Structuring of Biological Stress in Contact-Era Spanish Florida A Bioarchaeological Case Study from Santa Catalina de Guale, St. Catherines Island, Georgia

STRESSOR TIMING AND CORTISOL: UNFOLDING THE TIME-SCALE OF BIOLOGICAL STRESS RESPONSE

Using hyperosmolar stress to measure biologic and stress-activated protein kinase responses in preimplantation embryos

Biological consequences of oxidative stress-induced DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Parental Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms as a Moderator of Child’s Acute Biological Response and Subsequent Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Pediatric Injury Patients

Biological effects of off-pump vs. on-pump coronary artery surgery: focus on inflammation, hemostasis and oxidative stress

887 Comparison of hemodynamic performance of small-size biological and mechanical aortic valves with dobutamine stress echocardiography

Gramine Increase Associated with Rapid and Transient Systemic Resistance in Barley Seedlings Induced by Mechanical and Biological Stresses

The invalidity of the Laplace law for biological vessels and of estimating elastic modulus from total stress vs. strain: a new practical method

Effects of Daily Stressors on the Psychological and Biological Well-being of Spouses of Persons With Mild Cognitive Impairment

SEX DIFFERENCES IN BIOLOGICAL MARKERS OF HEALTH IN THE STUDY OF STRESS, AGING AND HEALTH IN RUSSIA

814 Oxidative stress and inflammatory response in conventional and off-pump coronary artery surgery: biological advantage of less invasivity

The Lumen-Facing Domain Is Important for the Biological Function and Organelle-to-Organelle Movement of bZIP28 during ER Stress in Arabidopsis

 

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An organism that finds itself, by accident or design, in a habitat to which it does not naturally belong. Examples include the fungus causing Dutch elm disease and certain types of algae and bacteria.

Subjects: Environmental Science.


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