Overview

Black Feminism


Related Overviews

women's Movement

Womanism

Harriet Jacobs (1813—1897)

Sojourner Truth (c. 1797—1883) American evangelist and reformer

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'Black Feminism' can also refer to...

Black Feminism

Black feminism

Experiencing Black Feminism

Black Feminism in Latin America and the Caribbean

Alone: Black Socialist Feminism and the Combahee River Collective

Sojourning for Freedom: Black Women, American Communism, and the Making of Black Left Feminism

Black Internationalist Feminism: Women Writers of the Black Left, 1945–1995

Separate Roads to Feminism: Black, Chicana, and White Feminist Movements in America's Second Wave

Feminist Coalitions: Historical Perspectives on Second-Wave Feminism in the United StatesRadical Sisters: Second-Wave Feminism and Black Liberation in Washington, DC

Anne M. Valk. Radical Sisters: Second-Wave Feminism and Black Liberation in Washington, D.C. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press. 2008. Pp. xiv, 253. $40.00

Bridging Race Divides: Black Nationalism, Feminism, and Integration in the United States, 1896–1935. By Kate Dossett. (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2008. xvi, 268 pp. $59.95, ISBN 978-0-8130-3140-8.)

Radical Sisters: Second-Wave Feminism and Black Liberation in Washington, D.C. By Anne M. Valk. (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2008. xvi, 253 pp. $40.00, ISBN 978-0-252-03298-1.)

Benita Roth. Separate Roads to Feminism: Black, Chicana, and White Feminist Movements in America's Second Wave. New York: Cambridge University Press. 2004. Pp. xiii, 271. Cloth $65.00, paper $23.00

Dayo F. Gore. Radicalism at the Crossroads: African American Women Activists in the Cold War. New York: New York University Press. 2011. Pp. xi, 231. $39.00 and Erik S. McDuffie. Sojourning for Freedom: Black Women, American Communism, and the Making of Black Left Feminism

 

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African-American women have always asserted their own worth as women and allied with black men to defend their group against the dominant society's demeaning racial oppression. After their forced settlement ...

Subjects: Literature.


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