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St Lucy, St Dunstan, the archangel Raphael, and St Thomas the Apostle are the patron saints of the blind.

blind as a bat completely blind, a simile recorded from the late 16th century; earlier comparisons of this kind were to beetles and moles, the common point being that all were seen as creatures who habitually moved in darkness.

blind man's buff a game in which a blindfold player tries to catch others while being pushed about by them; buff here means a buffet or blow.

a blind man's wife needs no paint there is no point in making efforts that cannot be appreciated; saying recorded from the mid 17th century.

blind with science confuse by the use of long or technical words or involved explanations; the expression is recorded from the 1930s.

there's none so blind as those who will not see used in reference to someone who is unwilling to recognize unwelcome facts, and recorded from the mid 16th century. A similar formation to there's none so deaf as those who will not hear.

turn a blind eye pretend not to notice. The expression is said to be in allusion to Lord Nelson (see Nelson), who lifted a telescope to his blind eye at the Battle of Copenhagen (1801), thus not seeing the signal to ‘discontinue the action’.

when the blind lead the blind, both shall fall into the ditch when a person is guided by someone equally inexperienced, both are likely to come to grief. The saying is recorded from the late 9th century, and alludes to Matthew 15:14, ‘Let them alone: they be blind leaders of the blind. And if the blind lead the blind, both shall fall into the ditch.’ Now most commonly in the metaphorical phrase, the blind leading the blind.

See also in the country of the blind, the one-eyed man is king, love is blind, a nod's as good as a wink to a blind horse, nothing so bold as a blind mare.

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