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Master of the Boccaccio Illustrations


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(fl c. 1470–90). South Netherlandish engraver. The name was given by Passavant to the anonymous engraver of nine illustrations in a French translation of Boccaccio, De La Ruine des nobles hommes et femmes, published by Colard Mansion (Bruges, 1476). This is the earliest surviving printed book to be illustrated with pasted-in engravings; of the few extant copies, the most complete, which contains eight hand-coloured prints, is in Boston, MA (Mus. F.A.). It is now clear that the nine illustrations are by different hands: Passavant, no. 5/Lehrs, no. 4, p 6/l 5, p 8/l 7–8 and possibly p 10/l 10 can be attributed to the illuminator known as the master of the Dresden prayerbook; p 3/l 2, p 7/l 6 and p 9/l 9 can be attributed to the Master of the White Inscriptions. The latter probably also executed p 4/l 3, which is a copy after the fragmentary print in the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, formerly attributed to the Housebook Master.

From The Grove Encyclopedia of Northern Renaissance Art in Oxford Reference.

Subjects: Renaissance Art.



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