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Gamaliel Bradford

(1863—1932)


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(1863–1932), Massachusetts author, who at age 50 found his most successful medium when he published Lee, the American (1912). This book employed a method he described as “psychography,” which aims to extract the essential, permanent, and vitally characteristic strands out of the continuous texture of a man's entire life. Applying this subjective, analytical technique, Bradford wrote a great many other sketches, published in such books as Confederate Portraits (1914); Portraits of Women (1916); Union Portraits (1916); American Portraits (1922); Damaged Souls (1923), perhaps his best-known book, dealing with such Americans as Aaron Burr, P.T. Barnum, John Randolph, and Thomas Paine; Wives (1925); As God Made Them (1929); Daughters of Eve (1930); and The Quick and the Dead (1931). His autobiographical works include A Naturalist of Souls (1917), Life and I (1928), and his Journal (1933), edited by Van Wyck Brooks.

From The Oxford Companion to American Literature in Oxford Reference.

Subjects: Literature.


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