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Celtic saint of the 6th century

who has given his name to St Breock (Cornwall) and Saint-Brieuc (Brittany). He was probably born in Cardigan where he founded a monastery. Whether or not he was educated in France, as his 12th-century Life claims, he died in Brittany in another of his monastic foundations. It is not certain that he was a bishop: more likely he was an abbot of the Celtic type who kept a bishop in his monastery as one of his subjects. No legend claims that anyone was the successor of St Brioc in the see of Saint-Brieuc. As Saint-Brieuc is near the sea, it was very vulnerable to Norse invasions. Therefore, the relics of Brioc were taken to Angers in the middle of the 9th century. In 1166 there was a translation, at which Henry II was present. In 1210 one arm, two ribs, and part of the neck bones were given back to Saint-Brieuc. On account of legends of his great charity he is the patron of purse-makers. Feast: 1 May; translation, 18 October.

G. H. Doble, The Saints of Cornwall, iv (1965), 67–104.

Subjects: Christianity.

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