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British subject


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'British subject' can also refer to...

British subject

British subject

British subject

British subject

Psychological Subjects: Identity, Culture, and Health in Twentieth-Century Britain

Sport and History: The State of the Subject in Britain

Psychological Subjects: Identity,Culture, and Health in Twentieth Century Britain

“Are We British Subjects of His Britannic Majesty or Objects?” British Subjects and the “Right to Have Rights,” 1920–1950

IRELAND, (Walter) Alleyne (died 1951), Author and Lecturer; a British subject, resident in the United States

VOYNICH, Wilfrid Michael (1865 - 1930), bibliographer, lecturer, and writer; naturalised British subject; Pole

The Civil War of 1812: American Citizens, British Subjects, Irish Rebels, and Indian Allies

Psychological Subjects: Identity, Culture, and Health in Twentieth-Century Britain. By Mathew Thomson.

Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860-1911

Agreement between Great Britain and Portugal for the Settlement of Claims of British Subjects, signed at London, 13 November 1840

Agreement between Great Britain and Honduras relative to the Private Claims of British Subjects, signed at Guatemala City, 27 March 1852

Convention between Great Britain and New Granada for the Liquidation of the Claims of a British Subject (Mr. Mackintosh), signed at Bogota, 13 December 1851

Agreement between Great Britain and Salvador, relative to the Nationality of Children of British Subjects born in Salvador, signed in Guatemala City, 26 October 1862

Agreement between Colombia and Great Britain for the Settlement of Certain Claims of British Subjects, signed at Bogota, 7 December 1868

Declaration between Denmark and Great Britain for the Exemption of British Subjects from Forced Loans and Military Service, signed at Copenhagen, 14 June 1869

 

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Under the British Nationality Act 1948, a secondary status that was common to all who were primarily citizens either of the UK and Colonies or of one of the independent Commonwealth countries. This status was also shared by a limited number of people who did not have any such primary citizenship, including former British subjects who were also citizens of Eire (as it then was) or who could have acquired one of the primary citizenships but did not in fact do so.

Under the British Nationality Act 1981 (which replaced the 1948 Act as from 1 January 1983), the status of British subject was confined to those who had enjoyed it under the former Act without having one of the primary citizenships; the expression Commonwealth citizen was redefined as a secondary status of more universal application. The Act provided for minors to be able to apply for registration as British subjects and for British subjects to become entitled to registration as British citizens by virtue of UK residence.

Subjects: Law.


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