Overview

caitta


Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

(Skt.). Term in Buddhist psychology (being a later form of caitasika) denoting derivative mental states or functions of the mind (citta). Lists of these, derived from the sūtras and differing in detail, are found in the various Abhidharma systems. The list found in Vasubandhu's Abhidharma-kośa was regarded as normative by many Buddhists in India and elsewhere and comprises (1) five universal functions: contact (sparśa), attention (manasikāra), feeling (vedanā), ideation (saṃjñā), and intention (cetanā); (2) five occasional functions: motivation (chanda), interest (adhimokṣa), recollection (smṛti), concentration (samādhi), and insight (prajñā); (3) eleven wholesome functions: trust (śraddhā), decency (hrī), decorum (apatrapā), non-attachment (alobha), non-hatred (adveṣa), non-deludedness (amoha), effort (vīrya), lucidity (praśrabhi), carefulness (apramāda), equanimity (upekṣā) and non-violence (avihiṃsā); (4) six root negative functions (kleśa): lust (rāga), hatred (pratighā), stupidity (avidyā), arrogance (māna), doubt (vicikitsā), and opinionatedness (dṛṣṭi); (5) 20 subsidiary negative factors (upakleśa): anger (krodha), hostility (upanāha), dissimulation (mrakṣa), malice (pradāsa), jealousy (īrṣyā), avarice (mātsarya), hypocrisy (māyā), dishonesty (śāṭhya), spitefulness (vihiṃsā), pride (mada), contempt (āhrīkya), indecorum (anapatrāpya), overexuberance (auddhatya), inattentiveness (styāna), distrust (āśraddhya), carelessness (pramāda), laziness (kauśīdya), forgetfulness (musitā smṛti), exitability (vikṣepa), and delusion (asaṃprajanya); and (6) four indeterminate functions: regret (kaukṛtya), drowsiness (middha), selection (vitarka), and discursive examination (vicāra). See also cetasika.

(1) five universal functions: contact (sparśa), attention (manasikāra), feeling (vedanā), ideation (saṃjñā), and intention (cetanā); (2) five occasional functions: motivation (chanda), interest (adhimokṣa), recollection (smṛti), concentration (samādhi), and insight (prajñā); (3) eleven wholesome functions: trust (śraddhā), decency (hrī), decorum (apatrapā), non-attachment (alobha), non-hatred (adveṣa), non-deludedness (amoha), effort (vīrya), lucidity (praśrabhi), carefulness (apramāda), equanimity (upekṣā) and non-violence (avihiṃsā); (4) six root negative functions (kleśa): lust (rāga), hatred (pratighā), stupidity (avidyā), arrogance (māna), doubt (vicikitsā), and opinionatedness (dṛṣṭi); (5) 20 subsidiary negative factors (upakleśa): anger (krodha), hostility (upanāha), dissimulation (mrakṣa), malice (pradāsa), jealousy (īrṣyā), avarice (mātsarya), hypocrisy (māyā), dishonesty (śāṭhya), spitefulness (vihiṃsā), pride (mada), contempt (āhrīkya), indecorum (anapatrāpya), overexuberance (auddhatya), inattentiveness (styāna), distrust (āśraddhya), carelessness (pramāda), laziness (kauśīdya), forgetfulness (musitā smṛti), exitability (vikṣepa), and delusion (asaṃprajanya); and (6) four indeterminate functions: regret (kaukṛtya), drowsiness (middha), selection (vitarka), and discursive examination (vicāra)

Subjects: Buddhism.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.