Overview

Thomas Case

(1844—1925) philosopher and college head


Related Overviews

metaphysics

idealism, British

Thomas Hill Green (1836—1882) philosopher

Edward Caird (1835—1908) philosopher and college head

See all related overviews in Oxford Index » »

 

'Thomas Case' can also refer to...

Thomas Case (c. 1598—1682) clergyman and ejected minister

Case, Thomas (1844–1925)

Case, Thomas (1844-1925), philosopher and college head

Case, Thomas (bap. 1598, d. 1682), clergyman and ejected minister

CASE, Thomas (1844 - 1925), President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, 1904–24

Monotonous enclosures for the Thomas–Fermi equation in the isolated neutral atom case

Vivaldi in colonial America: the cases of Francis Hopkinson, Peter Pelham and Thomas Jefferson

Thomas and the Gospels: The Case for Thomas’s Familiarity with the Synoptics. By Mark Goodacre.

Prosecutor (on the application of Victims) v Lubanga Dyilo (Thomas), Decision on the release of Thomas Lubanga Dyilo, Case No ICC-01/04-01/06-1418, ICL 616 (ICC 2008), 2nd July 2008, ICC Trial Chamber I

John Aberth. Criminal Churchmen in the Age of Edward III: The Case of Bishop Thomas de Lisle. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. 1996. Pp. xxiv, 280. $45.00

Shorter notice. Runaway Religious in Medieval England, c. 1240-1540. FD Logan\Criminal Churchmen in the Age of Edward III: The Case of Bishop Thomas de Lisle. J Aberth

Criminal Churchmen in the Age of Edward III: The Case of Bishop Thomas de Lisle. By John Aberth. University Park, Pa.: The Pennsylvania University Press, 1996. 280 pp. $45.00

Prosecutor v Lubanga Dyilo (Thomas), Decision on the Prosecutor’s application to separate the senior legal adviser to the pre-trial division from rendering legal advice regarding the case, Case no ICC-01/04-01/06, ICL 1507 (ICC 2006), 27th October 2006, ICC Pre Trial Chamber I

Situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Prosecutor (on the application of Victims) v Lubanga Dyilo (Thomas), Decision on the manner of questioning witnesses by the legal representatives of victims, Case no ICC-01/04-01/06-2127, Case No ICC-01/04-01/06, ICL 1541 (ICC 2009), 16th September 2009, International Criminal Court [ICC]; Trial Chamber I [ICC]

Plenty of Nothing: The Downsizing of the American Dream and the Case for Structural Keynesianism. By Thomas I. Palley. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998 and Contingent Work: American Employment Relations in Transition. Ed. by Kathleen Barker and Kathleen Christensen. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1998

Situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Prosecutor v Lubanga Dyilo (Thomas), Decision on victims' participation, Case No ICC-01/04-01/06, ICL 505 (ICC 2008), 18th January 2008, ICC Trial Chamber I

Situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Prosecutor v Lubanga Dyilo (Thomas), Decision on opening and closing statements, Case No ICC-01/04-01/06-1346, ICL 633 (ICC 2008), 22nd May 2008, ICC Trial Chamber I

Prosecutor (on the application of Victim a/0001/06 and ors) v Lubanga Dyilo (Thomas), Confirmation of charges, Case No ICC-01/04-01/06-803, ICL 892 (ICC 2007), 29th January 2007, ICC Pre Trial Chamber I

Situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Prosecutor v Lubanga Dyilo (Thomas), Judgment pursuant to Article 74 of the Statute, Case No ICC-01/04-01/06, ICL 910 (ICC 2012), 14th March 2012, ICC Trial Chamber I

 

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Philosophy

GO

Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

Thomas Case was born in Liverpool on 14 July 1844 and died in Falmouth on 31 October 1925. He was educated at Rugby School and came up to Balliol College, Oxford as a commoner in 1863. In 1869 he was elected fellow of Brasenose, where he remained until 1876. From 1883 to 1889 he was lecturer in Greek history at Christ Church; his first published work was Materials for the History of Athenian Democracy from Solon to Pericles (1874). In 1889 he was elected to the Waynflete Chair of Moral and Metaphysical Philosophy at Magdalen, where he remained until 1910. In 1904 he was elected President of Corpus Christi, while allowed to remain fellow of Magdalen. Case often intervened in public affairs, writing numerous letters to The Times, which were posthumously collected (1827), and many privately circulated pamphlets. Within his own university, he opposed in particular the admission and conferring of degrees to women and the relaxation of ‘Compulsory Greek’ for science students.

[...]

From The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy in Oxford Reference.

Subjects: Philosophy.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.