Overview

cell-free extract


'cell-free extract' can also refer to...

cell-free extract

cell‐free extract

cell-free extract

Formation of diacetyl by cell-free extracts of Leuconostoc lactis

Synthesis of cefminox by cell-free extracts of Streptomyces clavuligerus

Nitrocompound activation by cell-free extracts of nitroreductase-proficient Salmonella typhimurium strains

Cell-free RNA replication systems based on a human cell extracts-derived in vitro translation system with the encephalomyocarditisvirus RNA

Anaerobic degradation of mimosine-derived hydroxypyridines by cell free extracts of the rumen bacterium Synergistes jonesii

Corrigendum to: “Anaerobic degradation of mimosine-derived hydroxypyridines by cell free extracts of the rumen bacterium Synergistes jonesii” [FEMS Microbiology Ecology 27 (1998) 127–132]

Accessibility of DNA polymerases to repair synthesis during nucleotide excision repair in yeast cell-free extracts

Use of signal sequences as an in situ removable sequence element to stimulate protein synthesis in cell-free extracts

The DNA strand of chimeric RNA/DNA oligonucleotides can direct gene repair/conversion activity in mammalian and plant cell-free extracts

Targeted gene repair directed by the chimeric RNA/DNA oligonucleotide in a mammalian cell-free extract

Repair of DNA lesions induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in human cell-free extracts: involvement of two excision repair mechanisms in vitro.

SHORT COMMUNICATION: Negative interference of metal (II) ions with nucleotide excision repair in human cell-free extracts

A convenient microbiological assay employing cell-free extracts for the rapid characterization of Gram-negative carbapenemase producers

DNA double-strand break repair in cell-free extracts from Ku80-deficient cells: implications for Ku serving as an alignment factor in non-homologous DNA end joining

 

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A fluid obtained by rupturing cells and removing the particulate material, membranes, and remaining intact cells. The extract contains most of the soluble molecules of the cell. The preparation of cell-free extracts in which proteins and nucleic acids are synthesized represent milestones in biochemical research. See Chronology, 1955, Hoagland; 1961, Nirenberg and Matthaei; 1973, Roberts and Preston.

Subjects: Genetics and Genomics — Chemistry.


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