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civic culture


'civic culture' can also refer to...

Bacchus and Civic Order: The Culture of Drink in Early Modern Germany. By B. Ann Tlusty (Charlottesville, VA: University Press of Virginia, 2001. xii plus 288pp.)

Between Crown and Community: Politics and Civic Culture in Sixteenth-Century Poitiers

Between Crown and Community: Politics and Civic Culture in Sixteenth-Century Poitiers

Book Review: Bacchus and Civic Order. The Culture of Drink in Early Modern Germany

Building the South Side: Urban Space and Civic Culture in Chicago, 1890–1919

Building the South Side: Urban Space and Civic Culture in Chicago, 1890–1919. By Robin F. Bachin (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004. 448 pp.)

civic culture

Civic Culture and Everyday Life in Early Modern Germany

Civic Culture and Government Performance in the American States

Civic Culture and Housing Policy in Manchester, 1945–79

Civic Culture and the Politics of Planning for Neighborhoods and Housing in Post-Katrina New Orleans

Civic Cultures and Civic Colleges in Victorian England*

‘Civil Disorder is the Disease of Ibadan’: Chieftaincy and civic culture in a Yoruba city, by Ruth Watson. Oxford: James Currey, 2003. xii + 180 pp. £45.00 hardback. ISBN 0852554591 (hardback); £16.95 paperback. ISBN 0852554540 (paperback).

Civility and Civic Culture in Early Modern England: The Meanings of Urban Freedom

Cooperative Motherhood and Democratic Civic Culture in Postwar Suburbia, 1940–1965

The Counterrevolution of Progress: a Civic Culture of Modernity in Chicago, 1880–1910

“Culture-a-Go-Go”: The Ghirardelli Square Sculpture Controversy and the Liberation of Civic Design in the 1960s

Democracy and Civic Culture

Emilia-Romagna: From Civic Culture to Global Networks

Empire City: The Making and Meaning of the New York City Landscape. By David M. Scobey Building Gotham: Civic Culture and Public Policy in New York City, 1898–1938By Keith D. Revell

Gender, Civic Culture and Consumerism: Middle-Class Identity in Britain, 1800–1940, Alan Kidd and David Nicholls

Gender, Civic Culture and Consumerism: Middle-Class Identity in Britain, 1800–1940. Edited by Alan Kidd and David Nicholls and Paternalism and Politics: The Revival of Paternalism in Early Nineteenth-Century Britain. By Kim Lawes

Helen Tangires. Public Markets and Civic Culture in Nineteenth-Century America. Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003. xiii + 263 pp. ISBN 0-8018-7133-6, $45.00 (cloth).

Helen Tangires. Public Markets and Civic Culture in Nineteeth-Century America. (Creating the North American Landscape.) Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. 2003. Pp. xx, 265. $45.00

Hilary Bernstein. Between Crown and Community: Politics and Civic Culture in Sixteenth-Century Poitiers. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. 2004. Pp. xvi, 313. $57.50

J. Barry Jones and J. Osmond (eds), Building a Civic Culture, Institutional Change, Policy Development and Political Dynamics in the National Assembly for Wales, IWA/Welsh Governance Centre, 2002, 276 pp., pb. £15

Jeffrey Trask. Things American: Art Museums and Civic Culture in the Progressive Era.

Katherine Aaslestad. Place and Politics. Local Identity, Civic Culture, and German Nationalism in North Germany During the Revolutionary Era. (Studies in Central European Histories, number 36.) Boston: Brill. 2005. Pp. xiii, 384. $213.00

London's Triumphs and Civic Culture

 

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Quick Reference

A political culture characterized by (1) most citizens' acceptance of the authority of the state, but also (2) a general belief in participation in civic duties. The term was systematically deployed in Gabriel Almond and Sidney Verba's influential 1963 book, The Civic Culture, and revived in their The Civic Culture Revisited (1980). Prompted by a concern about a perceived problem of political stability in Western democracies, the civic culture model suggested that a polity in which citizens were informed about political issues, and involved in the political process, could not of itself sustain a stable democratic government. The civic culture is seen as an allegiant political culture in which political participation is mixed with passivity, trust, and deference to authority. Traditionality and commitment to parochial values are seen as balancing involvement and rationality. The Civic Culture provided a five‐nation study of citizen values and attitudes viewed as supportive of a democratic political system. In the mainstream of behavioural analysis when it was first published, the book has been somewhat eclipsed by the emphasis on policy analysis, although its influence can be seen in more recent work on social capital. Its concerns about the survival of democracy in Western societies now seem somewhat misplaced. The spread of higher levels of education through the population has encouraged new forms of participation in politics, such as social movements and campaigning interest groups.

Wyn Grant

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Subjects: politics.


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