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continuous culture


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'continuous culture' can also refer to...

continuous culture

continuous culture

continuous culture

Analysis of Streptococcus salivarius urease expression using continuous chemostat culture

Continuous culture of Methanococcus maripaludis under defined nutrient conditions

Reversible hydrogenase activity of Gloeocapsa alpicola in continuous culture

Shake it easy: a gently mixed continuous culture system for dinoflagellates

Glucose metabolism and cell size in continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Continuous culture enrichments of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria at low ammonium concentrations

Acid phosphatase production by Aspergillus niger N402A in continuous flow culture

Hydrogen metabolism of mutant forms of Anabaena variabilis in continuous cultures and under nutritional stress

Autonomous metabolic oscillation in continuous culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on ethanol

Adherence of ovine and human Bordetella parapertussis to continuous cell lines and ovine tracheal organ culture

Physiology and continuous culture of the hyperthermophilic deep-sea vent archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi ST549

The response to oxidative stress of Fusobacterium nucleatum grown in continuous culture

Influences of National Culture on Continuous Learning: Implications for Learning Objectives and Performance Management

Effect of marine autotrophic dissolved organic matter (DOM) on Alexandrium catenella in semi-continuous cultures

Physiological behaviour of Hanseniaspora guilliermondii in aerobic glucose-limited continuous cultures

Ecological effects of triclosan and triclosan monophosphate on defined mixed cultures of oral species grown in continuous culture

 

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A technique used to grow microorganisms or cells continually in a particular phase of growth. For example, if a constant supply of cells is required, a cell culture maintained in the log phase is best; the conditions must therefore be continually monitored and adjusted accordingly so that the cells do not enter the stationary phase (see bacterial growth curve). Growth may also have to be maintained in a particular growth phase if an enzyme or chemical product is produced only during that phase.

Subjects: Biological Sciences.


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