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Antonio Del Corro

(1527—1591) theologian


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(Lat., Corranus; Fr., Antoine de Bellerive; 1527–1591), converted Spanish monk and priest, moderate Calvinist minister. Corro, the nephew of an Inquisitor, was born in 1527, probably in Seville in southern Spain. He was presumably educated at the University of Seville, was ordained, and entered the Observant Hieronymite monastery of San Isidro, into which he introduced evangelical literature. When the Inquisition became aware of Protestants in the city, he fled to Geneva with a dozen monastic companions and received a scholarship from the rulers of Bern to study theology in Lausanne under Théodore de Bèze. He served rather erratically as a pastor in Béarn and Navarre in southwestern France. For a time he was a tutor to the future king Henry IV of France. After trying to attract his friend Casiodoro de Reina from England, he went to Orléans to accompany him to Bergerac. Forbidden as foreigners to remain in the area, in 1565 both were taken by Renée of France to Montargis near Paris, where Corro became her domestic chaplain with Juan Pérez de Pineda. Called in 1566 to a pastorate in Antwerp, he arrived just before foreigners were forbidden to minister there. He had time to publish Epistre aux pasteurs de l'église flamengue d'Anvers de la Confession d'Augsbourg (1567), which although ostensibly irenic in intention, succeeded in embittering relations between Lutherans and Calvinists in the city and jeopardized William of Orange's policies; and Lettre envoyée à la Majesté du roy des Espaignes (1567), pleading for religious tolerance and denouncing Roman Catholic practices. It can also be argued that he wrote the pseudonymous Sanctae Inquistionis Hispanicae artes detectae (1567), by Reginaldus Gonsalvius Montanus, which, with Corro's Antwerp publications, was a major instrument in the creation of the Black Legend.

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From The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation in Oxford Reference.

Subjects: Early Modern History (1500 to 1700).


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