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culverin


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A gun used aboard warships during the 15th and 16th centuries. It was of smaller calibre relative to its length than a cannon and therefore of greater range. It was preferred for arming ships during the 16th century rather than the heavy and comparatively unwieldy cannon and demi-cannon. The steady improvement in the quality and power of gunpowder and quicker combustion, together with increasing accuracy in the manufacture of the guns themselves, permitted smaller charges to be used and the length of the culverin to be reduced. This type of gun was subdivided into: 1. the culverin, a typical example of which would be of 5-in. calibre and firing a 7.7-kilogram (17-lb) shot; its length might vary greatly between 3.9 metres (13 ft) for a bow-chaser and 2.4–2.7 metres (8–9 ft) for a broadside gun;2. the demi-culverin, a 9-pounder of 4-in. calibre and up to 3.3 metres (11 ft) in length;3. the saker, a 5-pounder of 3-in. calibre and some 2.7 metres (9 ft) long;4. the minion, a 4-pounder of 3-in. calibre and also some 2.7 metres (9 ft) in length;5. the falcon and falconet, which were 2- to 3-pounders and 1- to 2-pounders respectively.For other types of heavy weapons carried aboard ships see gun.

1. the culverin, a typical example of which would be of 5-in. calibre and firing a 7.7-kilogram (17-lb) shot; its length might vary greatly between 3.9 metres (13 ft) for a bow-chaser and 2.4–2.7 metres (8–9 ft) for a broadside gun;

2. the demi-culverin, a 9-pounder of 4-in. calibre and up to 3.3 metres (11 ft) in length;

3. the saker, a 5-pounder of 3-in. calibre and some 2.7 metres (9 ft) long;

4. the minion, a 4-pounder of 3-in. calibre and also some 2.7 metres (9 ft) in length;

5. the falcon and falconet, which were 2- to 3-pounders and 1- to 2-pounders respectively.

Subjects: Maritime History — Warfare and Defence.


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