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A: Hugh Leonard Pf: 1973, Dublin Pb: 1973 G: Com. in 2 acts S: Kitchen and other locations, Dublin, 1968 C: 5m, 3fForty-year-old Charlie Tynan has returned to Dublin from London, because his foster-father (‘Da’), a former gardener, has just died. As he goes through Da's papers, the old man appears to him. Charlie tries to drive him away, but they settle to reminiscing together. Charlie recalls how the Young Charlie got his first job as a filing clerk with Mr Drumm, and met and wooed Mary Tate. Throughout this, Charlie is half resentful at the way his foster-parents stifle his attempts at education and sophistication, and half admiring of their resilient earthiness. The 18-year-old young Charlie is dismayed to see what the older Charlie has turned into. Charlie gets married and works for Drumm for 13 years. Charlie leaves for London, now as a budding playwright, but the now widowed Da refuses to come with him, leaving Charlie guilty about his departure. Drumm surprises Charlie by handing him a large sum of money, which Da had saved up from the money Charlie had sent him from London. Charlie leaves for London again, with Da following behind.

A: Hugh Leonard Pf: 1973, Dublin Pb: 1973 G: Com. in 2 acts S: Kitchen and other locations, Dublin, 1968 C: 5m, 3f

Using a device similar to the two Gars in Friel's Philadelphia, Here I Come!, the two Charlies here confront each other over their relationship with Da in a semi-autobiographical piece, which is an amusing and moving tribute to Hugh Leonard's own foster-father.

Subjects: Literary Studies (Plays and Playwrights).


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Hugh Leonard (b. 1926)


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