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Dalton's atomic theory


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A theory of chemical combination, first stated by John Dalton in 1803. It involves the following postulates:(1) Elements consist of indivisible small particles (atoms).(2) All atoms of the same element are identical; different elements have different types of atom.(3) Atoms can neither be created nor destroyed.(4) ‘Compound elements’ (i.e. compounds) are formed when atoms of different elements join in simple ratios to form ‘compound atoms’ (i.e. molecules).Dalton also proposed symbols for atoms of different elements (later replaced by the present notation using letters).

(1) Elements consist of indivisible small particles (atoms).

(2) All atoms of the same element are identical; different elements have different types of atom.

(3) Atoms can neither be created nor destroyed.

(4) ‘Compound elements’ (i.e. compounds) are formed when atoms of different elements join in simple ratios to form ‘compound atoms’ (i.e. molecules).

Subjects: Chemistry — Physics.


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