Overview

James Dance

(1721—1774) actor and writer


'James Dance' can also refer to...

Dance, James

Dance, James (1721–74)

Dance, James (1721–74)

Spiller, James (1692–1730), actor and dancer

Dance, James [performing name James Love] (1721–1774), actor and writer

James I's ‘dancing book ‘and the politicisation of ‘Saint Sabbath’

Skinner, James Scott (1843 - 1927), violinist, composer, dancing-teacher

Hewlett, James - Stage / Screen Actor, Concert Singer, Dancer, Tailor

Shand, Sir James [Jimmy] (1908–2000), accordionist and dance-bandleader

To James Love (James Dance), c. 1 September–c. 19 September2 1758

Going to Palais: A Social and Cultural History of Dancing and Dance Halls in Britain, 1918-1960. By James Nott.

James Nott. Going to the Palais: A Social and Cultural History of Dancing and Dance Halls in Britain, 1918–1960.

Sharp, Cecil James (1859–1924), collector of English folk-songs and dances

Music for the People: Popular Music and Dance in Interwar Britain. By James J. Nott (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. xiv plus 274 pp.)

Female Voices from an Ewe Dance-Drumming Community in Ghana: Our music has become a divine spirit, by James Burns

James J. Nott. Music for the People: Popular Music and Dance in Interwar Britain. (Oxford Historical Monographs.) New York: Oxford University Press. 2002. Pp. xi, 274

The Gender Dance. Ironic Subversion in C. S. Lewis’s Cosmic Trilogy (Studies in Twentieth Century British Literature, 11). By Monika HilderSurprised by the Feminine. A Rereading of C. S. Lewis and Gender (Studies in Twentieth Century British Literature, 12). By Monika HilderTrue Myth. C.S. Lewis and Joseph Campbell on the Veracity of Christianity. By James W. MenziesWhen the Eternal Can Be Met. The Bergsonian Theology of Time in the Works of C.S. Lewis, T. S. Eliot and W.H. Auden. By Corey LattaA Naked Tree. Love Sonnets to C. S. Lewis and Other Poems. By Joy Davidman. Don W. King (ed.)

 

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(1721–74), an actor specializing in character parts, including Malvolio in Dublin and Trinculo in Edinburgh. Using the stage name James Love, he achieved prominence as Falstaff. He took larger roles for Garrick at Drury Lane from 1762 and appeared as Falstaff in The Jubilee (1769).

From The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare in Oxford Reference.

Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism.


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