Danebury, Hampshire, England

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A developed hillfort of the middle Iron Age on the chalk downlands of central southern England. Extensively excavated by Barry Cunliffe between 1969 and 1989, the site was first occupied in the 6th century bc, when the defences consisted of a single bank and ditch with two opposed entrances. Inside a road ran between the entrances and divided the occupation area into sectors: dwellings were set around the edges while the central area was used for storage. A series of square shrines occupied the highest spot in the middle of the fort. In the early 4th century a further line of ramparts was added outside the first, the southwest gateway was closed, and the east gate was strengthened. The site seems to have been abandoned during the 1st century bc, thereafter being used only as a temporary refuge. Investigations in the surrounding landscape have revealed that the hillfort was surrounded by other kinds of settlement and enclosure.

http://www3.hants.gov.uk/danebury/ Iron Age hillfort in southern Britain and links to the Museum of the Iron Age in Andover.


B. Cunliffe, 1983, Danebury. London: Batsford and English Heritage

Subjects: Archaeology.

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