Daneel de Rijcke


Quick Reference

(fl Ghent, 1440–82). South Netherlandish painter. He is first recorded as a Master in Ghent on 11 May 1440 and was elected Dean of the Painters’ Guild in 1460–61 and again from 1462 to 1464. Under his deanship, an ordinance was issued in 1463 requiring manuscript illuminators to enrol in the Painters’ Guild and pay a quarter of the customary dues. His earliest documented painting, however, cannot be before 1466. His oeuvre is generally considered lost, with the exception of the controversial Calvary triptych (Ghent, St Bavo), first ascribed in 1824 to Gerard van der Meire (fl 1452; d 1512) and tentatively attributed to de Rijcke (De Schryver). Most still favour Justus of Ghent's authorship, however, while cautious sceptics ascribe the work to the so-called Master of the Ghent Calvary Triptych. De Rijcke's lost works include those referred to in a judgement of 17 June 1466 forcing him to complete paintings, possibly wall paintings for the Bishop of Cambrai in Ghent. In the same year de Rijcke painted ornamental and heraldic scenes for the city of Ghent. From April to July 1468 he collaborated on the decorations for the marriage of Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, and Margaret of York in Bruges. Of the 166 painters hired, de Rijcke, Vrancke van der Stockt of Brussels and Jacques Daret of Tournai received the highest fees. Back in Ghent, de Rijcke executed paintings to be placed at the city gates for the entry of the young Duchess. He is also documented painting a scene with figures for the wealthy Italian Odenin de Ville, originally from Chieri in Piedmont. A contract of 19 April 1469 between de Rijcke and the Augustinians in Ghent substantiates their commission of an altarpiece. Although Daneel de Rijcke is mentioned in various documents until 1482, his later whereabouts and the exact date of his death are unknown.

From The Grove Encyclopedia of Northern Renaissance Art in Oxford Reference.

Subjects: Renaissance Art.