Overview

deoxycholate


'deoxycholate' can also refer to...

deoxycholate

Injection Lipolysis With Phosphatidylcholine and Deoxycholate

Response to “Injection Lipolysis With Phosphatidylcholine and Deoxycholate”

Response to “Injection Lipolysis With Phosphatidylcholine and Deoxycholate”

Comments on “Injection Lipolysis With Phosphatidylcholine and Deoxycholate”

Reduction of Nephrotoxicity Associated with Amphotericin B Deoxycholate

Antileishmanial activity of nano-amphotericin B deoxycholate

A proteomic study of resistance to deoxycholate-induced apoptosis

Metabolic and Structural Effects of Phosphatidylcholine and Deoxycholate Injections on Subcutaneous Fat: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

Continuous Infusion of Escalated Doses of Amphotericin B Deoxycholate: An Open-Label Observational Study

Amphotericin B Deoxycholate Administered by Continuous Infusion: Does the Dosage Make a Difference?

Amphotericin B-deoxycholate overdose due to administration error in pediatric patients

Amphotericin B deoxycholate: no significant advantage of a 24 h over a 6 h infusion schedule

Commentary on: Metabolic and Structural Effects of Phosphatidylcholine and Deoxycholate Injections on Subcutaneous Fat: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

Commentary on: Metabolic and Structural Effects of Phosphatidylcholine and Deoxycholate Injections on Subcutaneous Fat: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

Differences in tissue drug concentrations following intravenous versus intraperitoneal treatment with amphotericin B deoxycholate or liposomal amphotericin B

Amphotericin B deoxycholate treatment of visceral leishmaniasis with newer modes of administration and precautions: A study of 938 cases

Continuous Infusion of Amphotericin B Deoxycholate: A Cost-Effective Gold Standard for Therapy of Invasive Fungal Infections?

Continuous Infusion of Amphotericin B Deoxycholate in the Treatment of Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis: Analysis of Safety and Fungicidal Activity

 

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Medicine and Health

GO

Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

A secondary bile acid produced from the salts of glycocholic and taurocholic acid by the action of bacterial enzymes in the intestine. The sodium salt is used as a biological detergent to lyse cells and solubilize cellular and membrane components.

Subjects: Medicine and Health.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.