Overview

distributional weight


'distributional weight' can also refer to...

distributional weight

distributional weight

distributional weight

Benefit–Cost Analysis and Distributional Weights: An Overview

Relationship between bread consumption, body weight, and abdominal fat distribution: evidence from epidemiological studies

Improving the quality of protein similarity network clustering algorithms using the network edge weight distribution

Weight, Height and Body Mass Index Distributions in Geographically and Ethnically Diverse Samples of Older Persons

Metabolic network properties help assign weights to elementary modes to understand physiological flux distributions

Robust and accurate data enrichment statistics via distribution function of sum of weights

De novo synthesis of a narrow size distribution low-molecular-weight heparin

The Use of Distributional Weights in Benefit–Cost Analysis: Insights from Welfare Economics

Molecular Weight Distributions of Industrially-Produced Poly-(ɛ-Caprolactams) by Gel Permeation Chromatography

RE: “CHANGES IN BODY WEIGHT AND BODY FAT DISTRIBUTION AS RISK FACTORS FOR CLINICAL DIABETES IN US MEN”

Changes in Body Weight and Body Fat Distribution as Risk Factors for Clinical Diabetes in US Men

Cross-sectional versus Prospective Associations of Sleep Duration with Changes in Relative Weight and Body Fat Distribution The Whitehall II Study

Differences in Birth Weight for Gestational Age Distributions According to the Measures Used to Assign Gestational Age

Obesity and the metabolic syndrome: role of different dietary macronutrient distribution patterns and specific nutritional components on weight loss and maintenance

Spatial distribution of the stomach weights of juvenile anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus L.) in the Bay of Biscay

Spatial distribution of leaf dry weight per area and leaf nitrogen concentration in relation to local radiation regime within an isolated tree crown

 

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The relative importance given to different members of a society in the evaluation of social welfare. As an example, let the utility level of consumer h be denoted Uh and define the social welfare functionThe value of αh is the distributional weight given to consumer h. The higher is the value of αh relative to the values for other consumers, the more important is the utility of h in the calculation of social welfare. For the utilitarian social welfare function all the distributional weights are equal and usually normalized to 1. For the Rawlsian, or maximin, social welfare function the distributional weights are equal to 0 for all consumers except the consumer with the lowest utility level who is assigned a weight of 1.

Subjects: Economics.


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