Overview

DNase I hypersensitivity


'DNase I hypersensitivity' can also refer to...

DNase I hypersensitivity

Mapping and Characterization of DNase I Hypersensitive Sites in Arabidopsis Chromatin

BinDNase: a discriminatory approach for transcription factor binding prediction using DNase I hypersensitivity data

PlantDHS: a database for DNase I hypersensitive sites in plants

iDHS-EL: identifying DNase I hypersensitive sites by fusing three different modes of pseudo nucleotide composition into an ensemble learning framework

Th2-specific DNase I-hypersensitive sites in the murine IL-13 and IL-4 intergenic region.

A reliable method to display authentic DNase I hypersensitive sites at long-ranges in single-copy genes from large genomes

Evidence that DNase I hypersensitive site 5 of the human β-globin locus control region functions as a chromosomal insulator in transgenic mice

Real-time PCR mapping of DNaseI-hypersensitive sites using a novel ligation-mediated amplification technique

Nucleosome and transcription activator antagonism at human β-globin locus control region DNase I hypersensitive sites

The polyoma virus enhancer cannot substitute for DNase I core hypersensitive sites 2–4 in the human β-globin LCR

DNaseI hypersensitivity at gene-poor, FSH dystrophy-linked 4q35.2

A DNase I hypersensitive site near the murine γ1 switch region contributes to insertion site independence of transgenes and modulates the amount of transcripts induced by CD40 ligation

Neither HMG-14a nor HMG-17 gene function is required for growth of chicken DT40 cells or maintenance of DNaseI-hypersensitive sites

Analysis of chromatin structure of rat α1-acid glycoprotein gene; changes in DNase I hypersensitive sites after thyroid hormone, glucocorticoid hormone and turpentine oil treatment

 

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The phenomenon whereby treatment of chromatin with deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) results in cleavage of DNA at sites that are poorly protected by histones. These ‘hypersensitive sites’ correspond with sites of active transcription in the genome.

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Subjects: Chemistry.


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