Overview

elasticity


Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

The property of certain materials that enables them to return to their original dimensions after an applied stress has been removed. In general, if a stress is applied to a wire, the strain will increase in proportion (see OA on the illustration) until a certain point called the limit of proportionality is reached. This is in accordance with Hooke's law. Thereafter there is at first a slight increase in strain with increased load until a point L is reached. This is the elastic limit; up to this point the deformation of the specimen is elastic, i.e. when the stress is removed the specimen returns to its original length. Beyond the point L there is permanent deformation when the stress is removed, i.e. the material has ceased to be elastic and has become plastic. In the plastic stages individual materials vary somewhat; in general, however, at a point B there is a sudden increase in strain with further increases of stress – this is the yield point. Beyond the point C, the breaking stress, the wire will snap (which occurs at point D).

Elasticity.

Subjects: Physics.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.