Overview

election campaigns, Presidential


'election campaigns, Presidential' can also refer to...

election campaigns, Presidential

campaigns, Presidential election

Presidential elections: Nominating campaigns and general elections

Presidential elections: Nominating campaigns and general elections

The Timeline of Presidential Elections: How Campaigns Do (and Do Not) Matter

A Worldwide Presidential Election: The Impact of the Media on Candidate and Campaign Evaluations

The 2010 Elections, the 112th Congress, the Tea Party Senators, and Gingrich’s Presidential Campaign

U.S. Presidential Elections and Foreign Policy: Candidates, Campaigns, and Global Politics from FDR to Bill Clinton

US Presidential Elections and Foreign Policy: Candidates, Campaigns, and Global Politics from FDR to Bill Clinton, ed. Andrew Johnstone and Andrew Priest

Donald A. Ritchie. Electing FDR: The New Deal Campaign of 1932. (American Presidential Elections.) Lawrence: University Press of Kansas. 2007. Pp. x, 274. $29.95.

A Magnificent Catastrophe: The Tumultuous Election of 1800, America's First Presidential Campaign. By Edward J. Larson. (New York: Free Press, 2007. xiv, 335 pp. $27.00, ISBN 978-0-7432-9316-7.)

Campaigns and the Court: The U.S. Supreme Court in Presidential Elections. By Donald Grier Stephenson Jr. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1999. xvi, 363 pp. Cloth, $49.50, isbn 0-231-10034-5. Paper, $19.50, ISBN 0-231-10035-3.)

Richard Johnston, Michael G. Hagen, and Kathleen Hall Jamieson. The 2000 Presidential Election and the Foundations of Party Politics. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. 2004. 216 pp. $55.00 (cloth); $19.99 (paper).
 Richard R. Lau and Gerald M. Pomper. Negative Campaigning: An Analysis of U.S. Senate Elections. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield. 2004. 192 pp. $65.00 (cloth); $26.95 (paper).

 

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Politics

GO

Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

Initially, candidates for President “stood” for election—they did not “run” for the office—so they would not be accused of being too ambitious for power. In 1789 and 1792 George Washington ...

Subjects: Politics.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.